Is This Common Weed The New Morphine?

Is it really possible that a common, everyday weed could be the new morphine?!

It isn’t new news to tell you that the nation is going through an opioid crisis right now. Millions of Americans have an addiction to these powerful pain medications. And, unfortunately, many overdose while chasing the “high” that comes from taking these strong drugs.

However, pain relief is still an important matter to address – especially in the prepping community. That’s because, when SHTF, we’re going to need items available that will help ease the pain and agony we feel from injuries and ailments.

Unfortunately, grocery store shelves will clear out hours after word gets out about the crisis. This also goes for pharmaceutical shelves as well. And so, while they may be convenient now, preppers will have to say “bye bye” to their painkiller prescriptions once SHTF.

Sure, some preppers will get their fix from the black market. However, morphine and other opioids will be in such high demand that the amounts left will be scarce. Not to mention, they’ll come with a pretty hefty price tag.

So what do we do?

Well, it turns out there’s a completely natural painkiller out there. And scientists are saying it may potentially be the “new morphine” we’ve all been waiting for.

And, not only is this painkiller all-natural, but it’s also common. So common, in fact, that countless homes have this plant growing in their backyards and ditches. Plus, since it can be seen growing all over the U.S., it’ll most likely be near you in a crisis!

However, one of the best benefits about this plant is that it is not illegal to grow or to have. Plus, unlike morphine and other addictive opioids, this plant does not contain addictive substances, and is not habit-forming. Not to mention, it is not toxic, so it won’t harm your health if you need it in an emergency.

This scientific discovery is absolutely crucial for preppers. That’s why it’s important to look at the upcoming information closely so you can answer the following question for yourself:

Is This Common Weed The New Morphine?

More and more researchers are discovering the benefits of “the new morphine” – aka the wild lettuce plant. And its effects are so strong, that many use it as a replacement for normal painkillers, such as Advil or Tylenol, as well as instead of prescription pain medications.

This tall, leafy plant is known for its small yellow buds and long leaves with ragged edges. Interestingly, it’s incredibly common in North America and England, making many wonder why we didn’t consider using this plant before. Not surprisingly, it is a cousin to the various lettuces we see on the produce shelves at a grocery store.

But what is it that makes this plant so effective at killing off pain? After all, its nickname “opium lettuce” came from somewhere. Well, its secret lies within the plant’s stem and leaves. Inside these is a white substance, which contains its pain relieving and sedative effects.

Here’s some more info from Ask A Prepper about this miraculous plant:

This milky substance is called lactucarium. And, while it doesn’t contain any opiates, it has similar side effects when used – it acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to lessen the feeling of pain, just like morphine.

Even though it seems to be the best kept secret, it has a history of being used as an alternative to pain relief.

Related: How To Make Pemmican, The Ultimate Survival Food (Video Tutorial)

Historical Use

Back in the 19th century, wild lettuce was already being used by some as a substitute to opium. But, it was in the 70’s that it started to gain significant popularity by those wanting a more natural remedy. Individuals were starting to use it for both pain relief, as well as recreational purpose.

In the earlier days, people using wild lettuce prepared it a couple different ways. One way was to cook the plant in a pan of water and sugar mix until it reduced to a thick syrup-like consistency. While this was an effective form, it was quite bitter even with the sugar added. The most common form however, was drying the stem and leaves to use as an herbal tea.

The tea remains popular today. But, it’s also being dried for smoking, or vaporizing. If you don’t care to grow it yourself, it can also be purchased as a dried herb, extract, or resin substance.

Related: Lost Remedies from Our Forefathers

Other Benefits

Here are the more popular reasons people are gravitating towards this natural painkiller and medicinal plant:

  • Migraines – People who use it for this purpose claim that they experience fewer migraines than they did prior to starting the herb.
  • Insomnia – A frequent use of wild lettuce is by people who have trouble sleeping. It produces a relaxed and euphoric feeling, helping a person fall asleep easier, without the addictive qualities of commonly prescribed sleeping aids.
  • Anxiety – Wild lettuce can act as a mild sedative, allowing people with anxiety to find a reprieve from the stress it causes.
  • Asthma and Cough – Wild lettuce has antitussive properties, which alleviates or suppresses a cough. Also, asthmatic patients who have used opiates notice more episodes if they go through opiate withdrawal. So, the use of wild lettuce instead of prescription opiates, could be a better option for them.

In addition to the above benefits, wild lettuce produces a euphoric state, similar to opiates, even though it does not contain any actual opiate… so it’s perfectly legal.

Want to know more about wild lettuce? Here’s an informational video giving you even more details about this amazing plant:

https://youtu.be/nUMbfaSEVRM

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1 COMMENT

  1. I have eaten this lettuce for years and did not know about its healing effect. Now I will add it to my garden as preferred plant. Years ago, I raised rabbits and I would harvest the plants in the spring and give it to them. They were bouncing on the doors in anticipation of the greens. My dad told me it was rabbit lettuce, so I assumed it was their favorite green. It was for my rabbits as they were prisoners in cages. Once in awhile I would take a leaf and eat it. I found it sweet, but did not know until now the other benefits. Thanks for the education.

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