How To Reuse Water In A Crisis (And Everyday Life)

Most preppers don’t even think about how to reuse water in a crisis. Which makes sense, because the average person doesn’t think about how to reuse water in everyday life, either.

I know this to be true because the average American wastes about 120 gallons of water every single day. This is done through things like taking long showers, washing dishes and produce, dumping out extra water in a water bottle,, and throwing out melted ice from the cooler at a party (just to name a few).

Now wasting water might not seem like a big deal. However, when you consider the fact that over 3.5 million people across the world are dying from lack of water, the reality sinks in. Something has to change.

Plus, just think about it from a survival perspective. Sure, you’ll need a way to purify water in a survival situation. But what about transporting it? What if the only source of water is miles away from your camp? Or what if you need to carry water to a friend in need, who’s in a different location?

In Africa, and other places without clean water close by, they’re forced to march miles with buckets on their heads to get water from one place to another. Could you do that? Would you want to do that? It’s doubtful.

Water is a very precious resource. And, like anything else, you’re going to want to save every single precious drop of that water you have left when SHTF. You’re going to want to hold onto it, and use it for things that are really important (rather than just wasting it, like the average American does).

Not to mention, if you’re bugging in, reusing water is an excellent way to save money on your water bill.

This is one issue that hardly anyone talks about in the prepping community. And yet it’s a very real one to consider.

Luckily, there’s a few solutions that’ll help take away that problem altogether. So pay attention, because you’re about to learn the very valuable lesson of…

How To Reuse Water In A Crisis (And Everyday Life)

In a survival situation, you’re going to want to avoid traveling back and forth for water whenever possible. That’s why some of the best solutions come from using the water already available to you. For example, you can use…

Rain Catchment

If you’re bugging in during a crisis, rain catchment systems can really be a lifesaver. Essentially, this system connects the gutters on the outside of your home to a large water tank. This is a great way to collect water, since it reuses the rainwater given to you and collects it, rather than wasting the water runoff (like normal). These is an efficient way to make use of the rain, no matter how much or little you get.

Install A Greywater System In The Home

Another effective way preppers can reuse water is to install a greywater system inside their home. According to Grey Water Action:

Greywater is gently used water from your bathroom sinks, showers, tubs, and washing machines. It is not water that has come into contact with feces, either from the toilet or from washing diapers.

Greywater may contain traces of dirt, food, grease, hair, and certain household cleaning products. While greywater may look “dirty,” it is a safe and even beneficial source of irrigation water in a yard. Keep in mind that if greywater is released into rivers, lakes, or estuaries, its nutrients become pollutants, but to plants, they are valuable fertilizer. Aside from the obvious benefits of saving water (and money on your water bill), reusing your greywater keeps it out of the sewer or septic system, thereby reducing the chance that it will pollute local water bodies. Reusing greywater for irrigation reconnects urban residents and our backyard gardens to the natural water cycle.

The easiest way to use greywater is to pipe it directly outside and use it to water ornamental plants or fruit trees. Greywater can also be used to irrigate vegetable plants as long as it doesn’t touch edible parts of the plants. In any greywater system, it is essential to use “plant friendly” products, those without salts, boron, or chlorine bleach. The build-up of salts and boron in the soil can damage plants. While you’re at it, watch out for your own health: “natural” body products often contain substances toxic to humans.

**Our Personal Favorite: Use A Somburro*

All of the above ideas are great, and can be very beneficial for saving and reusing water. However, they both involve installing a somewhat complex system, which may cost anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

Isn’t there an easier way to do your part and reuse the water you have without practically adding an extra addition onto the house?

Thankfully, the answer is a big fat YES. Our friends just started their own company, and when we heard about their product we wanted to tell the world. Their product: Somburro – a packable, portable, easy to use water system that allows you to reuse water anywhere you are, both in the home and out.

So how does it work? Watch the video to find out.

 

Isn’t that awesome? With just one Somburro, we can each do our part by reusing a minimum of one gallon of water per day. That’s a lot of water!

Uses For A Somburro

One of the best parts about this product is that it’s only $49 per bucket. That’s a small price to pay when you consider all the lifesaving circumstances you can use it for in a survival situation. For example, you can use a Somburro for:

  • Watering your crops on the farm
  • Watering the plants in your survival garden. After all, no plants = no food!
  • Cleaning camping gear after cooking
  • Reusing water from a nearby stream to give yourself a relaxing shower (plus watering the surrounding plants while you’re at it)
  • Using the container as a cooler, and then reusing the ice water later
  • Collecting rain water for drinking or cooking
  • Catching the water runoff coming off trees, leaves, and plants
  • Storing purified water, and then having a lightweight, compact and closed container to transport it in
  • Countless other uses!

Whether you’re at home or on the trail, Somburro is the clear choice for an easy, affordable solution.

But There’s Just One Problem…

Our friends at Somburro are just getting their business off the ground. And they have only 38 days to meet their $5,000 goal in order to adequately fund their efforts and get this project off the ground. Otherwise, they may have to call it quits.

Won’t you help them get this amazing business off the ground?

Please do this company (and yourself) a favor by supporting this amazing cause. Simply click “Back This Project” at the top of the Somburro’s website. From there, you can donate to the company, purchase a few Somburros for yourself and your family/friends, and even get some cool rewards.

Plus, you’ll feel even better about your contribution, since 2% of the company’s profits go directly to Organic Farms in need.

Thanks for supporting our friends at Somburro! When we all do our part, we can help save our most precious resource, and use it in the best way possible!

3 Responses
  • Thelma Whitehead
    October 26, 2017

    When I was small we were what people called share croppers and Dad, Made sure we had a well with good water. back then people dug wells by hand. It was hard back breaking work and the water was drawn from the well with a bucket and rope which was set about 8 or 10 feet above the top of the well. One used this to draw up a bucket of water. We washed clothes that we hung on a line to dry. We had a large tub that we pored water into for each to take a bath. It sometimes the only water for the animals to drink. We did not waste it because no one enjoyed drawing up a bucket of water. I have wondered why everyone has not thought of this for fresh drinking water. We drank it and cooked with it and used it anyway we needed to. Why is this not being talked about now?

  • Jan Patterson
    October 26, 2017

    Hi, THIS IS AWESOME! What a unique, easy, way for water catchment!
    My husband and I are just starting our own company, and funds are Extremely limited. But I’m going to show this to him and see if there is Anything we can do to help. Please keep up the good work. If THIS isn’t a straigjt shot to Heaven, I don’t know what is!! God Bless You in your endeavors. So Sincerely,
    Jan Patterson
    jan@linqline,com

  • Tony
    October 27, 2017

    I hope the idea catches on.

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